Rebranding Mental Illness

Rethink: Psychiatric Illness is an organization at UNC Chapel Hill that aims to create networks and end the stigma related to mental illnesses. They are committed to changing the way we think and talk about mental illness, and they accomplish this by organizing events aimed at fostering understanding among students and raising awareness about the current challenges in our mental health system. Their biggest project is a student-led sensitization training held several times a year, where students learn the basics about mental illnesses, the resources available at UNC, and how to be an affirming friend and peer.
 

Rethink is an important and influential organization with a community-based approach. They aim to make all members feel welcome and comfortable. Rethink is innovative, modern, and filled with intelligent people. Thus, when they contacted me about redesigning their logo, I was immediately interested.
 

Rethink’s past logos did not quite portray the message they wanted to send. They included brains, lightbulbs, and question marks. They wanted to move past those: brains were too cliché, lightbulbs gave the wrong implication (i.e. that ending mental illness is as simple as turning on a lightbulb), and question marks implied that people with mental illness were just confused. Other mental health organizations use puzzle pieces and gears; but again, that implies that people with mental health issues are broken and need to be “fixed” or “put back together.” While mental health should be addressed, people who are struggling should not feel like they are broken or incomplete. We needed to move past their previous logos (below) and portray what Rethink was about now.
 

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Rethink’s leadership team explained to me that they wanted to communicate concepts such as “homegrown” and “familial” to describe Rethink. We decided that using a head would be the best way to represent mental illness, but that the ideas of community and support could be represented using multiple heads. That led me to the idea of overlapping heads to show a sharing of ideas and connection among individuals. For colors, I went with a teal blue color combined with a deep purple. Using cool colors is calming, and the contrast of the dark purple with the soft blue allows for easy readability. I noticed that when the two heads overlapped, they formed a shape that looked like a lightbulb, so I added that element into a few sketches, just in case the Rethink team wanted to move in that direction instead.
 


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After seeing the initial drafts, the Rethink leadership team liked the text used in the top row of logos and liked the bottom center design with the head outlines overlapping. The overlapping heads represented community, and having outlines meant one head was not “on top,” which would imply that some people are more important than others. After making a few more edits, I created the final logo in blue, purple, and white to give the team color options.
 


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Working with Rethink gave me an opportunity to think critically about how to represent the complicated topic of mental illness in a logo. I was challenged to create a logo that represented community and support and moved away from traditional mental health logos that rely on brains, puzzle pieces, gears, and lightbulbs. I also enjoyed the conversation as we discussed what we wanted the logo to communicate and the importance of what certain designs would imply about mental illness.

Kids Change the World

If you’re a designer looking for non-profit work or you’re a non-profit seeking a graphic designer, check out Grassroots.org. Their goal is to connect charities and non-profits with tools, volunteers, and resources. Through Grassroots.org, I’ve found a lot of great non-profits with important missions and designed for them. One of the first organizations I designed for is Kids Change the World. KCTW is a “global youth-led non-profit organization that envisions a world in which young people work to combat societal issues to ensure all are blessed with the opportunities that allow them to lead productive and fulfilling lives.”

About the Organization

KCTW01Kids Change the World was started by Christopher Yao. When he was 10 years old, Christopher was diagnosed with an physical impediment, an under jaw bite. He was told that he needed corrective surgery before he turned 18, but the surgery would be extremely expensive and painful. However, Christopher found a doctor who was able to solve his problem without using surgery; as a result, Christopher became passionate about helping children with severe oral problems. This led to him founding Kids Change the World. He has since been named one of the 25 Most Powerful and Influential Young People in the World by Youth Service America, and has been recognized many, many, many times for making such a difference at such a young age.

My Contribution

Initially, Christopher approached me and asked me to redesign their logo. He wanted the design to look professional and clean, but also colorful and kid-friendly. The final logo featured two small hands on splashes of red, green, and blue paint; those colors are used again in the logo’s words. After designing the logo, I’ve gone on to design many other materials for Christopher. In addition to promotional materials for Kids Change the World, I also designed a logo for Smiles for Lives, a group within KCTW which works to “fund surgeries through various nonprofits and partner hospitals to change the lives of children through life-changing cleft-lip or palate surgery and post-surgical therapy.” Featured at the bottom of this page is a flyer I designed for the Smiles for Lives Read-A-Thon 2015. I’ve also worked with Christopher to design a logo for Medical Marvels, an umbrella program over Smiles for Lives.

Why It Matters

Graphic design is very important for non-profits. When you’re just starting out as a non-profit, appearance is especially important when looking for partners and supporters. A professional logo establishes legitimacy and makes it look like you know what you’re doing (even if you don’t). When you go to a website and it’s poorly made, difficult to navigate, and looks like it was made in 5 minutes, you’re going to be a lot less likely to donate to that organization than if their website looks sleek, clean, and professional. You could start a non-profit with the best mission statement and plan that’s ever been created, but if you have no logo, a plain website, and no social media presence, the only people who are going to give you financial support are your parents (if you’re lucky). Whether you like it or not, your appearance and branding matters, and that’s why it’s so crucial for non-profits (and all organizations) to have an established identity and brand. Websites like Grassroots.org are great, because they help non-profits find talented individuals to design for them and grow their brand. Design can also help you think about what you want to communicate and how—who is your audience? What appeals to them? What sort of presence are you trying to establish? How do you want people to view your organization? Graphic design is so much more than pretty colors. It forces you to define yourself, your values, and your goals, and then challenges you to communicate all of that visually. If you’re operating or thinking of starting a non-profit and need graphic design, check out Grassroots.org or email me at lisa@lisadzera.com.

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That Lucky Bracelet

That Lucky Bracelet is a global organization that sends “Smile Packages” (which include lucky bracelets) to children and teens throughout the country who are fighting a life threatening or severe life altering chronic medical condition. They’re “dedicated to spreading joy, one Smile Package at a time to pediatric patients.” They’ve got branches in Boston, New York, Pennsylvania, Seattle, Texas, Toronto, Italy, and New Zealand. I first heard about TLB when the founder, Sophie, approached me and asked me to publicize her organization. Once I read up on what TLB did and how much they have accomplished, I wanted to do more than just share a post about them. I noticed they had no logo and offered to design one for them based on Sophie’s direction. She immediately accepted and gave me some basic direction.

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Sophie liked the idea of having the T and B in “TLB” in plain text and then emphasizing the L using a script font that was comprised of beads. I decided to use a serif font for the T and B, which would give them an ever sharper contrast to the cursive L. Because TLB has branches in many different cities, I decided to keep the logo black and white and use a colored background, which would allow for differentiation among the locations. Because the bracelets are made out of beads, I used a subtle shade on the beads that comprise the L to ensure that the audience understood the connection. The light gray used in the beads was also the color of “That Lucky Bracelet” at the bottom of the logo, which tied the colors together and made the logo feel complete. I played around with making the L behind certain parts of the T and B. However, because the bracelet is the most important part of the logo (both because of the physical bracelet and the emphasis on the L for luck), I kept it in front of the other two letters.

That Lucky Bracelet is growing quickly and expanding into even more cities. They’re always looking for more volunteers, so check out their Facebook page to find ways to get involved!