logos

The Evolution of a Logo: My Process of Branding Myself

If you have a brand, and especially if you’re a graphic designer, having a logo is important. Logos help establish your identity, and if you’re a designer, it’s another way to show your talents. When designing a logo, there are a few things to keep in mind:

  • Is it timeless? Will it still work a year from now? 5 years from now?

  • Is it scalable? Is it easy to see at small (as small as a favicon) and large sizes?

  • Is it versatile? Does it work for digital and print material?

  • What does it represent? Does the logo embody what I want it to? What does it say about me as a designer?

I’ll take you through the process of creating a logo to brand myself with, and I’ll show you some of my previous logos and then explain what did and didn’t work with them, based on the four questions above.

My First Logo

When I designed my first logo back in my sophomore year of college, I had very basic knowledge of graphic design. The logo was simple and clean, but it was fairly boring. I knew how to use the pen tool to make basic lines, and I knew how to make shapes. I had also recently learned how to design banners, which clearly I was very excited about.
LD-LOGO

The biggest problem with my first logo is that it was the first idea I had, whereas now I know the importance of sketching out ideas, setting goals for your design, and clearly defining what you want your logo to represent. When I designed this logo, I just wanted something that looked good. However, the goal of graphic design is not just to make things look good. Design is about form and function, it’s about usability, and it’s about solving problems. Having a pretty logo with no meaning offered no representation of who I was as a designer. So, let’s consult the questions:

  • Is it timeless? There’s no guarantee that banners would be trendy in the future, or that I would like banners in the future, or that I would like teal in the future.

  • Is it scalable? Scaling this down would make it hard to read, both because of the size of my name and the thin stroke of the letters in the logo.

  • Is it versatile? The logo is too detailed and complex to work with other images, and it would only look good standing alone.

  • What does it represent? I like shapes and lines. And banners.

Logo #2

As I began taking graphic design classes, I found myself learning a ton of new skills. I could make things look 3D! I could cut out parts of an image! I could divide a shape into different parts! I learned about the pathfinder tool and my world changed! It was a very exciting time for a young designer such as myself. However, my abundance of new knowledge and skills meant that my next logo was a little too eccentric.
LD-Logo-Design

This logo looked cool, but it had a bit too much going on. Some of the shadows and angles were not aligned or positioned property. Plus, it didn’t pass the four questions:

  • Is it timeless? The specific colors and 3D look of this logo could become outdated or out of style over time.

  • Is it scalable? Somewhat, but the lines in the design would get lost as size decreases.

  • Is it versatile? The logo only looked good on a dark gray background, and changing the colors made the logo look very different, so the colors needed to remain the same always. This meant the logo always had to be on a dark background. Short answer: No, not versatile.

  • What does it represent? The logo gives off a fun, playful vibe. While some of my work does have that style, the logo somewhat limits its portrayal of my capabilities and discredits more professional, serious work I design.

Current Logo

To reach my current logo, I put a lot of time and effort into creating the best possible design. I sketched out countless ideas, playing around with different ways I could align my initials and create interesting shapes and lines. I wanted to convey professionalism and position myself as a successful motion, UI/UX, and identity designer. Thus, I wanted my logo to be simple, bold, and easy to read, while still looking visually interesting.
LD-Full-Logo

I chose this design as my current logo because it looks sleek, professional, and clean. My initials combine to form a shape that looks like a mouse pointing towards my name, which brings the eye to my name. This logo is extremely effective alone (without my name next to it), making it ideal for marketing materials and branding. It passes all four questions, as well.

  • Is it timeless? Yes. The simplicity of the logo means it can adapt to different mediums, no matter what the future has in store.

  • Is it scalable? Yes. The logo is still easy to comprehend when it is as small as a favicon, and its boldness means it looks strong and powerful when sized larger.

  • Is it versatile? Definitely. Again, the simple lines and design of this logo means it can work for any product, whether that’s a 3D video, a business card, or printed on a pen. The shape is what makes the logo recognizable, which means I can change the logo’s color based on the product and not lose recognition.

  • What does it represent? This logo represents usability and clear, comprehensible design, which is what I focus on most in my work. With the move towards mobile devices and smaller technology, making designs usable and understandable is crucial, and this concept is demonstrated in my logo.

Branding yourself visually takes a lot of time, but once you decide on a logo and style for yourself and your brand, you’re going to look a lot more legitimate and well-established. To learn more about branding yourself, check out my blog post with 5 steps to build your brand online.

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lisadzera

About the author: Lisa Dzera

I’m a graphic, motion, and UI designer who thrives on finding creative, outside-the-box solutions to design challenges. I have a love for coffee and an eye for design.

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