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Expressing Complex Concepts in a Simple Logo

One of the most challenging aspects of logo design is communicating the complicated company values, mission, and services in a simple logo that translates easily over print and digital mediums. Especially now that over half of all digital media usage is via mobile devices, there’s a huge push for simple logos that scale down to mobile devices easily. That’s simple enough if your client wants a logo with their company name and a simple shape, but what if you’re designing a more complicated logo?

I was recently faced with this challenge when designing a logo for a program within the UNC Environmental Finance Center. The EFC offers many tools and resources, including a calculator used as a Financial Health Checkup for Water Utilities. The tool assesses the financial performance of your water (and/or wastewater) utility fund and demonstrates the financial strengths and weaknesses of the utility fund in the past 5 years.

Pretty cool, right? But not pretty simple. When I was given the task of creating a logo for this tool, I was told to:

  • Communicate that this resource deals with money/finance

  • Find a way to show that the tool evaluates the health of a water utility

  • Make it obvious that this is about water

So, all I had to do was create a simple and clean logo that communicates the complex ideas of money, health, and water in a way that was easy to understand but also visually appealing. A water utility in a doctor’s outfit holding dollar bills? A coin wearing a stethoscope swimming through pipes? No, those wouldn’t work. I needed to somehow show that this tool evaluated the health of the financial performance of your water utility fund. Also, it needed to be simple, easy to understand, and aesthetically appealing in all forms of media.

As with any logo design, the first step was sketching. I decided to first sketch out simple ways to illustrate each of the three concepts I needed to communicate, and then find ways to combine them into one image.

efc_money

Sketching ideas for money was fairly simple. I decided any of the options could work, so it just depended on which of these ideas went best with the visual representations for health and water.

efc_health

Illustrating health was a little more complex, because I needed to communicate the evaluation of health. While some of my ideas represented health, they didn’t represent evaluating your own health. Only the stethoscope, heart monitor, and checkmark represented the evaluation of health. The check seemed too vague, and the heart monitor brought in two extra elements (heart and jagged line), when I only wanted one. Bringing in two elements for health would overcomplicate the logo. I really liked the flexibility of a stethoscope, so I decided to move forward with that.

efc_water

To visualize water, I figured I should keep it simple. Using a water drop seemed like the best option, as any other ideas I had were too complex. Plus, displaying water with a showerhead or sink didn’t make sense, since this logo was about water utilities.

efc_combo

Now I needed to find a way to combine these all together. I decided to first find a way to combine money and health. My favorite ideas were the stethoscope on the piggy bank and the stethoscope that formed a dollar sign. I decided to move forward with those ideas in Adobe Illustrator and create those vectors.

efc_logos

After designing the two options in Illustrator, I decided the piggy bank idea was too complicated. It ended up looking awkward and clunky. However, the stethoscope/dollar sign idea looked clear, concise, and visually interesting. Next step: Typography.

efc_font

I drafted a few ideas that emphasized “Financial Health Checkup” and used the same colors in my logo’s image. I liked the two on the left the best, because when “for water utilities” was stretched too much, it looked clunky and large. The typography in the bottom left corner looked the most professional and clean, so I decided to move forward with that one.

efc_final

And, finally, I combined the typography with the image, which I decided to put in a water drop to bring the final element in. Changing the color of the main text to blue made it fade away too much, so the bottom right was the winner. My boss and I were both very happy with the final result. Check it out live here!

efc_logofinal

About the author: Lisa Dzera

I’m a graphic, motion, and UI designer who thrives on finding creative, outside-the-box solutions to design challenges. I have a love for coffee and an eye for design.

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